Xbox Outline New Community Standards

Microsoft have released a new community standards document with examples of how to treat each other online. The standards document outlines some best practice but also acts as a warning to players who abuse each other.

Microsoft says “We built Xbox Live for people like you—for players from all walks of life, everywhere in the world, who all want the same thing: a place to play and have fun. We need your help keeping the Xbox online community safe and fun for everyone”.

The document goes into a fair amount of detail in what is and is not acceptable behaviour to one another online. Microsoft outlines their thoughts regarding trash talk “We get it—gaming can be competitive and interactions with other players can get heated. A little trash talk is an expected part of competitive multiplayer action, and that’s not a bad thing. But hate has no place here, and what’s not okay is when that trash talk turns into harassment.”

Acceptable trash talk includes

  • Get destroyed. Can’t believe you thought you were on my level.
  • That was some serious potato aim. Get wrecked.
  • Only reason you went positive was you spent all game camping. Try again, kid.
  • Cheap win. Come at me when you can actually drive without running cars off the road.
  • That sucked. Get good and then come back when your k/d’s over 1.

Going too far looks like

  • Get [sexual threat]. Can’t believe you thought you were on my level.
  • Hey [profanity], that was some serious potato aim. Get wrecked, trash.
  • Only reason you went positive was you spent all game camping. KYS, kid.
  • Cheap win. Totally expected from a [racial slur] .
  • You suck. Get out of my country—maybe they’ll let you back in when your k/d’s over 1.

Microsoft makes it very clear there are consequences if players don’t adhere to the guidelines by saying “Our priority is the safety and enjoyment of everyone on Xbox Live. Content and behaviour that puts players at risk or makes them feel unwelcome have no place in the Xbox online community. So, sometimes we need to step in. We’re not out to punish, but rather to protect everyone’s experience.”

It’s a nice touch from Microsoft and sets some clear ground rules for everyone to follow.

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